Acne is found to be associated with the Dairy products and High glycemic index foods

White riceResearchers have found that high glycemic index foods and the dairy products are linked to acne.

This research has been published online in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Acne refers to the skin condition represented by the blackheads and pimples on the face, neck and shoulders. It usually affects adolescents.

Researchers linked diet including chocolate, sugar and fat to the development of acne since 1800s but from 1960s, this linkage of diet and acne started fading away.

“This change occurred largely because of the results of two important research studies that are repeatedly cited in the literature and popular culture as evidence to refute the association between diet and acne,” Jennifer Burris, MS, RD, of the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, said in a statement. “More recently, dermatologists and registered dietitians have revisited the diet-acne relationship and become increasingly interested in the role of medical nutritional therapy in acne treatment.”

Researchers in this study did a literature survey and found that high glycemic index/glycemic load diet, such as white bread, most white rice, corn flakes, and potatoes, and frequent dairy consumption are among the most important factors in the relation between diet and acne.

Based on this finding, researchers have reported that medical nutrition therapy (MNT) can play an important role in the treatment of acne.

“This research is necessary to fully elucidate preliminary results, determine the proposed underlying mechanisms linking diet and acne, and develop potential dietary interventions for acne treatment,” Burris said. “The medical community should not dismiss the possibility of diet therapy as an adjunct treatment for acne. At this time, the best approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling.”

Source: Eurekalert

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