Boring activities could enhance creativity

Researchers have found that the boredom at work could help us to become more creative as it gives us more time to daydream.

This is the result of the research done by Dr Sandi Mann and Rebekah Cadman from the University of Central Lancashire at the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology. This research has been presented on 9th January at the Annual Conference  of the British Psychological Society Division of Occupational Psychology.

Boring and yawning

Researchers conducted two studies. In one study, 40 participants were asked to do a boring task such as copying the numbers out of a telephone directory for 15 minutes and then asked to complete another task to show their creativity such as writing the different uses for a pair of polystyrene cup. Researchers found that these 40 participants were more creative than the 40 participants, who were not asked to do some boring tasks.

In the other task, researchers studied two groups of 30 participants each. One group copied the numbers as before but the second group was asked to read the numbers. Then they were asked for a creativity test. Researchers found that the people in the group, who were asked to read the numbers only, were more creative than the people in the other group. This shows that more boring activities like reading an unwanted thing or attending long meetings could enhance creativity due to more chances of daydreaming or imagining than the people who writes something.

“Boredom at work has always been seen as something to be eliminated, but perhaps we should be embracing it in order to enhance our creativity. What we want to do next is to see what the practical implications of this finding are. Do people who are bored at work become more creative in other areas of their work – or do they go home and write novels?” Dr Mann said in a statement.

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