Use of ACE inhibitors in pregnancy

Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) are a class of antihypertensive drugs. A research published in British Medical Journal (BMJ) shows that the use of ACE inhibitors in the first trimester of pregnancy could lead to malformations in live births and the same results were obtained after the use of other antihypertensive drugs or in hypertensive pregnant women who were not using any antihypertensive drugs.

Previous studies on the use of ACE inhibitors in the second and third trimesters indicated the fetal toxicity but recent studies showed the teratogenic affects (affects on embryo or fetus) of ACE inhibitors in the first trimester.

Researchers conducted a study of more than 465,000 mother infant pairs from 1995-2008 in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California System. They found that 0.16% of pregnant women used ACE inhibitors while 3.8% of pregnant women used other antihypertensive drugs. Moreover, 0.09% of pregnant women used ACE inhibitors in the first trimester while 0.01% of pregnant women used ACE inhibitors in the second and third trimester.

They found that use of ACE inhibitors during the first trimester resulted in 20% increase in risk of malformations in offsprings. However, use of other anithypertensives during the first trimester was also found to be related to the same increased risk of malformation.

The researchers also reported that malformation in offspring is also related to hypertension itself.

Reference:

Li, D-K, et. al. (2011). Maternal exposure to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in the first trimester and risk of malformations in offspring: a retrospective cohort study. British Medical Journal,  doi: 10.1136/bmj.d5931

saypeople

SayPeople.com gives you the news and information about Science, Research, Technology, Business and Islam.