Tag Archives: physics

Patent for a 20 kilometer tall tower for space launch and research

Concept of a space elevator by Thoth Technology (Source: Thoth Technology)
Concept of a space elevator by Thoth Technology (Source: Thoth Technology)

Thoth Technology, a Canadian tech company, has recently filed a patent for a 12.4 mile high (i.e. about 20 kilometer tall reaching the stratosphere, and about 20 times higher as compared to Dubai’s Burj Khalifa) “space elevator” that can become an alternative to rocket for astronauts, i.e. this invention will help to launch astronauts as well as tourists into orbit.

According to the patent of the company, it will be an inflatable, pneumatically pressured tower having a liftoff point (platform to launch) to space at the top. According to the company, this invention will help to save over 30% of the fuel of a conventional rocket.

“From the top of the tower, space planes will launch in a single stage to orbit, returning to the top of the tower for refueling and reflight,” stated Brendan Quine, who is the inventor of the ThothX Tower.

This invention will help to launch the rocket in a horizontal manner by removing the requirement for vertical launch, i.e. flight will be much like a passenger plane.

“In our concept, you ascend electrically and remove the whole vertical launch phase,” Quine stated. “Then you get into a space plane, which is like a passenger jet, and take off horizontally.”

This tower will serve not only for the launch of astronauts but it would also help in the generation of wind-energy, scientific research, communications, and tourism (as told earlier).

It is still on the paper but patent is showing that the company has moved a step to bring the physical product.

Source: Thoth Technology (http://thothx.com/news-2/)

The pitch drops that got the world talking

Main Points:

In light of recent results from the “world’s longest experiment”, spanning more than 90 years, at the University of Queensland, a group of researchers from Trinity College Dublin explain the background behind their own pitch-drop experiment in this month’s Physics World and offer an explanation as to why their research hit the headlines in 2013.

Published in:

Physics World

Study Further:

Capturing the release of a drop of pitch – a thick, black, sticky material – from a funnel on camera seems mundane, yet created a storm of media interest last week for the Australian experiment, as it did over a year ago for the Irish one. Researchers at Trinity were the first to capture their pitch dropping on camera and the subsequent footage was viewed more than two million times on YouTube.

In their article, the Trinity researchers say they believe the attention came from their story being short, quirky and something that both aroused curiosity and came with a high amount of tension and human interest. The latter was caused by a dramatic sequence of events and bad luck related to the similar experiment in Queensland.  Continue reading The pitch drops that got the world talking

Drayson Foundation donation to tackle the girls in physics conundrum

Main Point:

A pilot programme designed to counter the factors that turn many schoolgirls away from physics is due to run over the next three years thanks to a generous £201,000 donation from the Drayson Foundation.

Study Further:

The funds will enable the Institute of Physics (IOP) to work with a cluster of six secondary and a selection of primary schools in the Thames Valley region to find ways of reducing the gender imbalance of students progressing to physics A-level.

In a pilot study with secondary and primary schools, the IOP will run a selection of activities to build girls’ confidence in the classroom, while also raising awareness of potential gender biases across the whole school.

Dr Frances Saunders, President of the Institute of Physics, said, “We want to inspire students and ensure that everyone who develops an interest in physics is encouraged to pursue the subject and reap the benefits of a physics education.

Continue reading Drayson Foundation donation to tackle the girls in physics conundrum