Posts Tagged ‘health’

Weight Gain in Children Occurs After Tonsil Removal, Not Linked to Obesity

Main Points:

Weight gain in children after they have their tonsils removed (adenotonsillectomy) occurs primarily in children who are smaller and younger at the time of the surgery, and weight gain was not linked with increased rates of obesity.

Published in:

JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Authors:

Josephine A. Czechowicz, M.D., and Kay W. Chang, M.D., of the Stanford University School of Medicine, California.

Background:

About 500,000 children in the United States have their tonsils removed each year. The childhood obesity rate prompted reevaluation of the question of weight gain after adenotonsillectomy.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 18, 2014 at 1:00 am

Categories: Medical   Tags: , , , , , ,

Changing where a baby is held immediately after birth could lead to improved uptake of procedure that reduces infant iron deficiency

Main Points:

Changing where a newborn baby is held before its umbilical cord is clamped could lead to improved uptake in hospitals of delayed cord clamping, leading to a decreased risk of iron deficiency in infancy, according to new results published in The Lancet.

Published in:

The Lancet

Study Further:

Delaying clamping of the umbilical cord until around two minutes after birth allows for blood to pass from the mother’s placenta to the baby, and has previously been shown to reduce the risk of iron deficiency in infancy.

However, current recommendations – based on studies conducted 35 years ago – suggest that for effective placental transfusion to occur, the baby needs to be held at the level of the placenta (introitus position), which is cumbersome, uncomfortable for the person holding the baby, and interferes with immediate contact between mother and baby.

Since these issues could be contributing to low compliance with this procedure in hospitals, ultimately resulting in higher than necessary levels of iron deficiency in babies and children, a group of researchers in Argentina tested whether the transfer of blood in delayed cord clamping procedures is affected by the position in which the baby is held immediately after birth.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 17, 2014 at 5:01 am

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Atypical Brain Connectivity Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Main Points:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in adolescents appears to be associated with atypical connectivity in the brain involving the systems that help people infer what others are thinking and understand the meaning of others’ actions and emotions.

Published in:

JAMA Psychiatry

Authors:

Inna Fishman, Ph.D, of San Diego State University, California, and colleagues,

Background:

The ability to navigate and thrive in complex social systems is commonly impaired in ASD, a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting as many as 1 in 88 children.

How the Study Was Conducted:

The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate connectivity in two brain networks involved in social processing: theory of mind (ToM, otherwise known as the mentalizing system, which allows an individual to infer what others are thinking, their beliefs, their intentions) and the mirror neuron system (MNS, which allows people to understand the meanings and actions of others by simulating and replicating them). The study included 25 adolescents with ASD (between the ages of 11 and 18) and 25 typically developing adolescents.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - at 1:00 am

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Free Drug Samples Can Change Prescribing Habits of Dermatologists

Main Point:

The availability of free medication samples in dermatology offices appears to change prescribing practices for acne, a common condition for which free samples are often available.

Published in:

JAMA Dermatology

Author:

Michael P. Hurley, M.S., and colleagues from the Stanford University School of Medicine, California.

Background:

Free drug samples provided by pharmaceutical companies are widely available in dermatology practices.

How the Study Was Conducted:

The authors investigated prescribing practices for acne vulgaris and rosacea. Data for the study were obtained from a nationally representative sample of dermatologists in the National Disease and Therapeutic Index (NDTI), a survey of office-based U.S. physicians, and from an academic medical center where free drug samples were not available.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - at 1:00 am

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Shock therapy improves pain and function in patients with chronic calcific shoulder tendinitis

Main Point:

Shock therapy improves pain and function in patients with chronic calcific shoulder tendinitis.

Published in:

Annals of Internal Medicine

Study Further:

Rotator cuff tendinitis is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain and may present with or without calcifications. There is little evidence to suggest that conventional therapies, such as rest, ice, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and subacromial corticosteroid injections can effectively ease pain or restore function. Calcific tendinitis, in particular, may be more difficult to manage and may require surgery.

Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), which uses sound waves of high or low energy that impart rapid fluctuations of pressure to tissues, has been suggested as an alternative treatment to expensive and risky surgical interventions.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 15, 2014 at 2:00 am

Categories: Medical   Tags: , , , , , , ,

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