Tag Archives: cancer

Increased Risk for Head, Neck Cancers in Patients with Diabetes

Diabetes (Credit: Carol Garcia/GOVBA/Flickr)Main Point:

Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to increase the risk for head and neck cancer (HNC).

Published in:

JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Author:

Kuo-Shu Tseng, Ph.D., of the Tainan University of Technology, Taiwan, and colleagues. Continue reading Increased Risk for Head, Neck Cancers in Patients with Diabetes

Racial Disparities in Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Women with Breast Cancer

Sentinel nodeMain Points:

The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) to stage early breast cancer increased in both black and white women from 2002 to 2007, but the rates remained lower in black than white patients, a disparity that contributed to disparities in the risk for lymphedema (arm swelling common after breast cancer treatment because of damage to the lymphatic system).

Published in:

JAMA Surgery

Author:

Dalliah M. Black, M.D., of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Background:

SLNB was developed to replace axillary (arm pit) lymph node dissection (ALND) for staging early breast cancer to minimize complications. SLNB can often provide patients with a much more limited surgery. Racial disparities exist in many aspects of breast cancer care but their existence in the use of SLNB had been uncharacterized. Continue reading Racial Disparities in Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Women with Breast Cancer

Use of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Not Associated With Increased Risk of Cancer

Tumor necrosis factor α (Source: Wikipedia)

Main Points:

In a study that included more than 56,000 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, use of a popular class of medications known as tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists was not associated with an increased risk of cancer over a median follow-up of 3.7 years, although an increased risk of malignancy in the long term, or with increasing number of doses, cannot be excluded, according to a study in the June 18 issue of JAMA.

Published in:

JAMA

Study Further:

Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) antagonists are drugs that have been shown to be beneficial in reducing the inflammation in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis). The therapeutic benefits of TNF-α antagonists must be weighed against the potential for adverse effects, including a possible increased risk of cancer. “Therefore, long-term observational studies of consequences of treatment with TNF-α antagonists are needed,” the authors write.

Nynne Nyboe Andersen, M.D., of the Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, and colleagues studied cancer rates in patients with IBD exposed to TNF-α antagonists, as compared with patients with IBD not exposed to these drugs. The study included 56,146 patients (15 years or older) with IBD identified in the National Patient Registry of Denmark (1999-2012), of whom 4,553 (8.1 percent) were treated with TNF-α antagonists. Cancer cases were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry.

In total, 3,465 patients with IBD unexposed to TNF-α antagonists (6.7 percent) and 81 exposed to TNF-α antagonists (1.8 percent; median follow-up, 3.7 years) developed cancer. The study results indicated that exposure to TNF-α antagonists was not associated with an increased overall cancer risk. In addition, no site-specific cancers were observed in significant excess. Continue reading Use of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Not Associated With Increased Risk of Cancer