Posts Tagged ‘Bacteria’

Human activity influences beach bacterial diversity

Main Point:

High beach bacterial diversity may contribute to less water contamination.

Published in:

PLOS ONE

Study Further:

Human activity influences ocean beach bacterial communities, and bacterial diversity may indicate greater ecological health and resiliency to sewage contamination, according to results published March 5, 2014, in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Elizabeth Halliday from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and colleagues.

Beaches all contain bacteria, but some bacteria are usually from sewage and may contaminate the water, posing a public health risk. In this study, scientists studied bacterial community composition at two distant beaches (Avalon, California, and Provincetown, Massachusetts) during levels of normal- and high-contamination (measured using a fecal or ‘poop’ indicator) by genetically sequencing over 600,000 bacteria from 24 dry sand, intertidal sand, and overlying water sampling sites at the locations. Waters at the Avalon site frequently violate water quality standards, while waters at the Provincetown site have infrequent water quality violations.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - March 6, 2014 at 3:00 am

Categories: Medical   Tags: , , , , ,

Predicting the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria

Antibiotics (Credit: Samantha Celera/Flickr)

The ability to predict exactly where and when a future outbreak of antibiotic-resistant bacteria will emerge is of obvious utility for improving public health. But despite the fact that the public databases are already brimming with tens of thousands of cataloged DNA mutations that confer such resistance, those don’t reveal how other mutations may emerge, and forecasting outbreaks remains beyond the predictive power of modern science. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - March 4, 2014 at 9:27 pm

Categories: Medical   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Bacterial Biofilms: Fast and Slow Streamers

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureas (MRSA). (Credit: NIAID/Flickr)

Unwanted, harmful bacterial cells can be found fouling surfaces everywhere from lifesaving medical devices to toe-jamming pond scum — often in the form of “biofilms,” where they clump together into a slimy, protective surface. In recent years, many researchers have been exploring the physics behind biofilm formation and trying to figure out better ways mitigate the problem or to prevent the fouling films from forming in the first place.

Howard Stone and his colleagues at Princeton are exploring the mechanics and molecular biology of one biofilm-related phenomenon known as streamer formation. When biofilms grow and develop in the presence of fluid flow, they form three-dimensional thread-like offshoots made of polymers and cells. These “streamers” can rapidly clog small channels and quickly foul sanitary surfaces.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - March 3, 2014 at 10:38 pm

Categories: Technology   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Tree branch filters water

Pine tree branches (Credit: Jonathon Colman/Flickr)

Main Point:

Pine tree sapwood filters bacteria from contaminated water.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - February 27, 2014 at 3:00 am

Categories: Medical, Other   Tags: , , , , ,

New type of bacteria found in extremely clean and sterilized rooms of NASA

Berry-shaped Tersicoccus pheonicis (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Main Point:

Scientists have found new type of microbes, probably bacteria, in the extremely clean rooms of NASA. Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by Usman Zafar Paracha - November 7, 2013 at 7:30 pm

Categories: Medical   Tags: , , , , , , ,

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