Posts Tagged ‘astronomy’

A Study in Scarlet

The star formation region Gum 41 (Credit: ESO)

The star formation region Gum 41 (Credit: ESO)

Main Points:

This new image from ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that causes the surrounding hydrogen to glow with a characteristic red hue.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 16, 2014 at 3:00 pm

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Chance Meeting Creates Celestial Diamond Ring

The planetary nebula Abell 33 captured using ESO's Very Large Telescope (Credit: ESO)

The planetary nebula Abell 33 captured using ESO’s Very Large Telescope (Credit: ESO)

Main Points:

Astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have captured this eye-catching image of planetary nebula PN A66 33 — usually known as Abell 33. Created when an aging star blew off its outer layers, this beautiful blue bubble is, by chance, aligned with a foreground star, and bears an uncanny resemblance to a diamond engagement ring. This cosmic gem is unusually symmetric, appearing to be almost circular on the sky.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 9, 2014 at 3:00 pm

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Astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey make the most precise measurement yet of the Expanding Universe

An artist’s conception of how BOSS uses quasars to measure the distant universe. Light from distant quasars is partly absorbed by intervening gas, which is imprinted with a subtle ring-like pattern of known physical scale. Astronomers have now measured this scale with an accuracy of two percent, precisely measuring how fast the universe was expanding when it was just 3 billion years old. (Zosia Rostomian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and Andreu Font-Ribera (BOSS Lyman-alpha team, Berkeley Lab))

An artist’s conception of how BOSS uses quasars to measure the distant universe. Light from distant quasars is partly absorbed by intervening gas, which is imprinted with a subtle ring-like pattern of known physical scale. Astronomers have now measured this scale with an accuracy of two percent, precisely measuring how fast the universe was expanding when it was just 3 billion years old. (Zosia Rostomian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and Andreu Font-Ribera (BOSS Lyman-alpha team, Berkeley Lab))

Main Points:

Astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have used 140,000 distant quasars to measure the expansion rate of the universe when it was only one-quarter of its present age. This is the best measurement yet of the expansion rate at any epoch in the last 13 billion years.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 7, 2014 at 10:00 pm

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New Research Finds “Geologic Clock” That Helps Determine Moon’s Age

Main Points:

An international team of planetary scientists determined that the Moon formed nearly 100 million years after the start of the solar system, according to a paper to be published April 3 in Nature. This conclusion is based on measurements from the interior of the Earth combined with computer simulations of the protoplanetary disk from which the Earth and other terrestrial planets formed.

Published in:

Nature

Study Further:

The team of researchers from France, Germany and the United States simulated the growth of the terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) from a disk of thousands of planetary building blocks orbiting the Sun. By analyzing the growth history of the Earth-like planets from 259 simulations, the scientists discovered a relationship between the time the Earth was impacted by a Mars-sized object to create the Moon and the amount of material added to the Earth after that impact.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - April 2, 2014 at 10:00 pm

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Galactic Serial Killer

The contrasting galaxies NGC 1316 and 1317 (Credit: ESO)

The contrasting galaxies NGC 1316 and 1317 (Credit: ESO)

Main Points:

This new image from the MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile shows two contrasting galaxies: NGC 1316, and its smaller neighbor NGC 1317. These two are quite close to each other in space, but they have very different histories. The small spiral NGC 1317 has led an uneventful life, but NGC 1316 has engulfed several other galaxies in its violent history and shows the battle scars.

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Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by saypeople - at 3:00 pm

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