New project to remove conflict among galaxy simulations

Andromeda Galaxy with tilt shift effect (Credit: Imgur)
Andromeda Galaxy with tilt shift effect (Credit: Imgur)

Main Point:

In a new project dubbed AGORA, researchers are working to remove the discrepancies among different computer models of galaxy formation by comparing different codes against each other.

Published in:

arXiv

Study Further:

The project AGORA is the short form for Assembling Galaxies of Resolved Anatomy. “We investigate galaxy formation with high-resolution numerical simulations and compare the results across different platforms, and with observation,” Project AGORA website noted.

Nine codes, nine galaxy formation scenarios: this is the sort of problem that AGORA is devoting itself to resolving by comparing different supercomputer simulations. (Credit: Simulations performed by Samuel Leitner (ART-II), Ji-hoon Kim (ENZO), Oliver Hahn (GADGET-2- CFS), Keita Todoroki (GADGET-3), Alexander Hobbs (GADGET-3-CFS and GADGET-3-AFS), Sijing Shen (GASOLINE), Michael Kuhlen (PKDGRAV-2), and Romain Teyssier (RAMSES))
Nine codes, nine galaxy formation scenarios: this is the sort of problem that AGORA is devoting itself to resolving by comparing different supercomputer simulations.
(Credit: Simulations performed by Samuel Leitner (ART-II), Ji-hoon Kim (ENZO), Oliver Hahn (GADGET-2- CFS), Keita Todoroki (GADGET-3), Alexander Hobbs (GADGET-3-CFS and GADGET-3-AFS), Sijing Shen (GASOLINE), Michael Kuhlen (PKDGRAV-2), and Romain Teyssier (RAMSES))

 

“The physics of galaxy formation is extremely complicated, and the range of lengths, masses, and timescales that need to be simulated is immense,” stated Piero Madau, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz and co-chair of the AGORA steering committee.

“You incorporate gravity, solve the equations of hydrodynamics, and include prescriptions for gas cooling, star formation, and energy injection from supernovae into the code. After months of number crunching on a powerful supercomputer, you look at the results and wonder if that is what nature is really doing or if some of the outcomes are actually artifacts of the particular numerical implementation you used.”

This project would increase our knowledge about the dark matter and its effects on universe as this object is hard to study physically at this time and such models are the best source to study them.

Sources:

Project AGORA – http://goo.gl/xuYEKk

Worldwide collaboration announces project AGORA: Ambitious comparison of high-resolution computer simulations of galaxy formation and evolution – University of California (http://goo.gl/RiZLER)

Astrophysicists launch ambitious assessment of galaxy formation simulations – University of California (http://goo.gl/2yt6qB)

Ji-hoon Kim, Tom Abel, Oscar Agertz, Greg L. Bryan, Daniel Ceverino, Charlotte Christensen, Charlie Conroy, Avishai Dekel, Nickolay Y. Gnedin, Nathan J. Goldbaum, Javiera Guedes, Oliver Hahn, Alexander Hobbs, Philip F. Hopkins, Cameron B. Hummels, Francesca Iannuzzi, Dusan Keres, Anatoly Klypin, Andrey V. Kravtsov, Mark R. Krumholz, Michael Kuhlen, Samuel N. Leitner, Piero Madau, Lucio Mayer, Christopher E. Moody, Kentaro Nagamine, Michael L. Norman, Jose Oñorbe, Brian W. O’Shea, Annalisa Pillepich, Joel R. Primack, Thomas Quinn, Justin I. Read, Brant E. Robertson, Miguel Rocha, Douglas H. Rudd, Sijing Shen, Britton D. Smith, Alexander S. Szalay, Romain Teyssier, Robert Thompson, Keita Todoroki, Matthew J. Turk, James W. Wadsley, John H. Wise, Adi Zolotov, & for the AGORA Collaboration (2013). The AGORA High-Resolution Galaxy Simulations Comparison Project arXiv arXiv: 1308.2669v4

Usman Zafar Paracha

Usman Zafar Paracha is Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutics, in Hajvery University, Lahore, Pakistan.