Scientists confirmed the Higgs boson

CERN

Main Point:

Scientists have confirmed on March 14th at the annual Rencontres de Moriond conference in Italy that the particle that was discovered last year in the world’s largest atom smasher is actually the Higgs Boson.

Study Further:

Higgs boson is the elementary particle that is 126 times the mass of the proton and is believed to give mass to the other elementary objects.

Last year on July 4th, scientists reported with 99% certainty that the newly found particle was Higgs Boson, aka “God particle”. Now the scientists have confirmed, by the lack of spin and its parity, that they are Higgs boson after taking two and a half times more data inside the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In simple words, you can say that the God particle confirms almost everything else. Actually, according to the theory, objects get their size and shape, when the particles interact with the Higgs boson in an energy field. So, the mass increases with the increased attraction of the particles.

“The preliminary results with the full 2012 data set are magnificent and to me it is clear that we are dealing with a Higgs boson though we still have a long way to go to know what kind of Higgs boson it is,” CMS spokesperson Joe Incandela, said in a statement.

“The beautiful new results represent a huge effort by many dedicated people. They point to the new particle having the spin-parity of a Higgs boson as in the Standard Model. We are now well started on the measurement programme in the Higgs sector,” ATLAS spokesperson Dave Charlton, said in a statement.

Although the spin and parity of the particle are supporting the God Particle but finding the “plain vanilla” Standard Model Higgs is considered as one-in-a-trillion event and the scientists have thought to work further on the particle, i.e. decay of the bosons into other particles, whether that is the “Standard Model Higgs boson” or not, and it will take time.

“To characterize all of the decay modes will require much more data from the LHC.” CERN statement.

Source: CERN Via: Space, USA Today