Color of the cup influences the taste of the hot drinking chocolate

Researchers have found that the color of the cup influences on the taste of the hot chocolate.

This research has been done by researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the University of Oxford and published online in the Journal of Sensory Studies.

Hot Chocolate in the cup

Recently, researchers reported that the color of the tablet could change the behavior of the patient towards medication that is important, especially for the pharmaceutical industry. Now this research about the effect of colors is important for the food industry.

Researchers have reported that hot drinking chocolate tastes better in the cream or orange colored cup as compared to white or red colored cup. This research showed that the work of our senses change with the color and characteristics of the container.

“The color of the container where food and drink are served can enhance some attributes like taste and aroma,” as explained to SINC by Betina Piqueras-Fiszman, researcher at the Polytechnic University of Valencia (Spain).

Hot Chocolate (Credit: myrecipes.com)Researchers worked with 57 participants, who were given samples of hot chocolate in four different colored cups, i.e. white, cream, red and orange with white on the inside, with the same size. Researchers found that the orange or cream colored cups increased the taste of the drinking chocolate. Participants reported slight increase of sweetness and aroma in the cream colored cup and overall the sweetness and the aroma were not much affected by the color of the cup.

“There is no fixed rule stating that flavor and aroma are enhanced in a cup of a certain color or shade,” recognised Piqueras-Fiszman. “In reality this varies depending on the type of food, but the truth is that, as this effect occurs, more attention should be paid to the color of the container as it has more potential than one could imagine.”

This research indicates that the other liquids could also taste better in certain colored cups.

Researchers wrote, “These results are relevant to sensory scientists interested in how the brain integrates visual input (such as color), not only from the food itself, but also from the container, packaging or plateware from which it is being consumed. In addition, these results should hopefully help stimulate chefs, restaurateurs and those working in the food and beverage packaging sectors to think more carefully about the color of their plateware/packaging and its potential effects on their customers’ perception of the taste/flavor of the products that they happen to be serving/delivering to market.”

Concentrate on the two cups or look them one after another for three to five times and you would feel some aroma with slight taste of chocolate. This is not in research, we have felt this.

Reference:

Piqueras-Fiszman, B., & Spence, C. (2012). The Influence of the Color of the Cup on Consumers’ Perception of a Hot Beverage Journal of Sensory Studies, 27 (5), 324-331 DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-459X.2012.00397.x