CRS/HIPEC therapeutic strategy is found to be helpful for peritoneal mesothelioma; Research

SurgeryResearchers have found that cytoreductive surgery (CRS) in combination with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) is safe as a therapeutic strategy for peritoneal mesothelioma.

These researches have been published in the World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery and Gastroenterology Research and Practice.

In HIPEC, warmed anti-cancer drugs are administered and circulated in the peritoneal cavity (abdomen) for a short period of time. Usually, mitomycin-C and cisplatin are administered as anti-cancer drugs. This administration of the drug is done after the CRS and the heating procedure in this helps in easy penetration of the drug into the tissues.

In order to determine the safety of this program, researchers from University of Arizona compared the group of patients with tumors including 14% of patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, who were given the CRS/HIPEC therapeutic strategy, to those who were not given. Although, researchers found post operative complications in 36% of patients but no post operative deaths among the CRS/HIPEC patients studied. This procedure is also found to be helpful in preventing the spread of mesothelioma within the abdomen.

Researchers have found that the peritoneal cancer index (PCI), which is a measure of the severity of the cancer, has the value of 10 in the patients who underwent CRS/HIPEC while the patients who were not recommended this therapeutic strategy had a PCI of 25.

Researchers have found that this combination of therapeutic strategy is safe even for new surgeons.

Reference:

Paul H. Sugarbaker, David Chang, and O. Anthony Stuart, (2012). Hyperthermic Intraoperative Thoracoabdominal Chemotherapy. Gastroenterology Research and Practice, doi:10.1155/2012/623417

Ioannis T Konstantinidis, Christine Young, Vassiliki L Tsikitis, Ellyn Lee, Tun Jie, and Evan S Ong, (2012). Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion: The University of Arizona early experience. World Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, doi:  10.4240/wjgs.v4.i6.135